Georgian minister visits WHO/Europe

WHO

Dr Andria Urushadze, Minister of Labour, Health and Social Affairs of Georgia, and Ms Zsuzsanna Jakab, WHO Regional Director for Europe, met on 1 December 2010

On 1 December 2010, Dr Andria Urushadze, Minister of Labour, Health and Social Affairs of Georgia, visited WHO/Europe in Copenhagen, Denmark.

Ms Zsuzsanna Jakab, WHO Regional Director for Europe, and Dr Urushadze discussed common areas of interest, including strengthening health information systems in the country, and training and developing the health workforce to match the new infrastructure and emerging needs, such as increasing levels of noncommunicable diseases.

Dr Urushadze took up his duties as Minister on 10 September 2010, and the meeting followed an official invitation from Ms Jakab, to develop a mutual understanding of WHO/Europe’s and the Ministry’s work, and to discuss issues related to the current and future bilateral collaboration between Georgia and WHO.

Other issues on the agenda included developing a long-term health policy, strengthening immunization programmes and epidemiological surveillance, implementing the International Health Regulations, applying measures to control increased resistance to antibiotics and establishing WHO collaborating centres in Georgia.

It was agreed that WHO/Europe would provide technical support to the Ministry in developing a concept paper on further building the Georgian health policy and health system. The paper will focus on the country’s health information system, human resources for health and health service provision (hospital and primary health care development, public health and health financing).

The visit also provided Dr Urushadze with an opportunity to meet senior staff at WHO/Europe and deepen his understanding of WHO’s work at the regional and intercountry levels.

WHO/Europe works closely with the Ministry of Labour, Health and Social Affairs of Georgia on:

  • strengthening the health system by enhancing stewardship;
  • improving child and maternal health to achieve the Millennium Development Goals;
  • addressing communicable diseases, including tuberculosis, HIV/AIDS, and malaria, as well as implementing the International Health Regulations; and
  • addressing noncommunicable diseases and environmental health issues.