2-day TEACH VIP workshop on child injury prevention conducted in Hungary

National Institute for Health Development/Erzsebet Szucs

30 participants from different disciplines and sectors attended a workshop to build capacity on child injury and violence prevention on 12–13 October 2015 in Budapest, Hungary. The meeting was organized by WHO/Europe and the National Institute for Health Development as part of the biannual collaborative agreement between WHO and the Ministry of Human Capacities. Modules of the Training, Educating and Advancing Collaboration in Health on Violence and Injury Prevention (TEACH-VIP) curriculum, (developed by WHO and a network of global injury prevention experts) were used for lectures and working groups on child injury and maltreatment prevention.

Dr Erzsebet Szucs of the National Institute for Health Development welcomed participants and explained the scope and purpose. Dr Pusztai Zsofia, Head of WHO Country Office in Hungary, stressed the importance of tackling child injuries in the country and that multisectoral collaboration was required in line with Health 2020. Dr Peter Csanyi, Head of the Department of Public Health, Ministry of Human Capacities, emphasized an integrated approach to injury prevention and surveillance. A draft strategy on child injury prevention and negotiations are planned for its adoption under the Healthy Hungary 2020 strategy.

Dr Dinesh Sethi, Programme Manager, Violence and Injury Prevention at WHO/Europe, and Ms Dimitrinka Jordanova Peshevska, WHO consultant on violence prevention, addressed child injury and maltreatment prevention. Dr Peter Varsanyi of the National Institute for Health Development presented the burden of childhood injury in Hungary.

Participants rated the course highly, resolving to promote the uptake of TEACH-VIP for health professional training in child injury and violence prevention and to use it in their capacity as trainers. They stated that their understanding of the public health approach to child injury and violence prevention had increased and that they would try to promote intersectoral collaboration for the development of preventive policies and programmes.